Oh to Own a Designer Dress!

How many women can honestly say, without crossing fingers behind backs, that they have not gone weak-kneed at the sight of that oh so alluring designer dress, which sparkles so suggestively in the shop window? It can be safely assumed, judging by the popularity of such dresses, that those who answer 'no' are in the minority.

Seemingly innocent at first glance, the power a beautifully designed garment can hold over a person, is astonishing. Just go to any designer shop and you will hear the agonised mutterings of 'Oh, I really should not … No, I'm not going to buy it … Well, there's no harm in just trying it on .. Oh God, I love it … No, I can not buy it … Ok, just this once … '

The heart usually prevails and the person in question returns home with the contented feeling they have just bought something special; something that not everyone else has. This is the lure of the designer.

Although clothing's fundamental purpose is to protect the body from nature's elements, its role has radically altered over time. Historians believe the first clothes consist of materials like fur, leather and leaves, which were wrapped around a person's body, thus sheltering them from the weather. In today's society however, clothes are viewed more as a statement about an individual, rather than being necessary for their survival.

Advances in technology, such as central heating, helped to bring about this change, but it is understood that Charles Frederick Worth, born in England in 1825, shaped the world of clothing, and in particular, women's dressmaking; thus giving birth to the term 'fashion' in the way we understand it today.

After moving to France to work for Parisian drappers, Gagelin and Opigez, Mr Worth married one of their models, where he began making dresses for her. Soon after, customers began asking for replicas of the dresses, which prompted him to seek financial backing for his own dressmaking business.

In time, he became named for his designs, which were much simpler and said to be more flattering for the lady's figure than others of the time; he has become popular with an array of rich, distinguished women, including royalty and the famous. He also moved away from letting women design garments themselves, and instead chose to display his own designs at fashion shows, which were held four times a year.

So the rise of the designer dress began, and other fashion designers followed suit to create whole collections of designer clothes.

Fashion designers are now commonplace, designing clothing for individual clients, specialty stores and / or high-fashion department stores. What distinguishes their clothing from the norm is the originality of design, coupled with the limited availability of garment numbers.

This, essentially, is what makes designer clothing so bought after and is why those skilfully crafted designer dresses can make one go weak-kneed in praise – not only at the thought of possessing one, but also in the knowledge that they own something unique.

6 Tips About Extended Warrantys For Your Automobile

Like any other insurance, you get what you pay for and trying to save a few dollars may not get you the coverage you need. The following are some basic tips to keep in mind when you are considering an extended warranty policy.

1. The first this you should ask yourself is whether or not you need an extended warranty.

On average, most auto manufacturers offer a 3 year or 36,000 mile bumper to bumper warranty. However, if your drive more the 12,000 mile per year and plan to keep your vehicle for a long time, then an extended warranty may be what you are looking for to get that peace of mind.

2. How reliable is your car? You should take a look at the reliability history of your automobile. Even though this is not fail-safe, it will give you an idea of ​​how much service you can expect. This information should be kept in mind when looking at an extended warranty.

3. What is the track record and history of the company?

Here are some question to ask yourself about the company:

– How long have they been in business? – How quickly do they payout to get a repair? – Do they offer roadside assistance? – Are there testimonials from other consumers you can read? – What is they standing with Better Business Bureau and other consumer watchdogs?

4. What about the repairs, can they be done at any repair shop? It's best to choose an extended warranty that, at the very least, gives you more than one service facility to choose from. You'll most certainly appreciate this if your vehicle ever need service while you're on a road trip, miles away from home.

5. How do you know which plan is right for you? If you want bumper-to-bumper coverage the up front cost will be higher, but this offers the most coverage. If you select a higher deduction per repair and you automobile is trouble pron, you may end up spending more money in the long run. Read the fine print!

Here are some questions to ask when selecting a plan:

– Is the plan transferable or renewable? – Where can you have the repairs done? – Do you have to outlay cash up front for the repairs and wait for a reimbursement? – Does the plan offer any roadside assistance? If you travel a lot or have long commutes, this type of plan may be just right for you. With travel assistance you can get:

– car rental reimbursement – food and lodging – flat tires repaired – gas if you run on empty – a tow – and etc.

6. If you make the decision to get an extended warranty, there are three type to choose from: – Manufacturer: Typically, no problems about the cost of a repair but this has the highest up front costs and repair shop may be limited in your area. – Dealer: has a lower up front cost and you get the plan at the same place you bought the vehicle, but there is usually only one point of service for repairs. – Independent: has the lowest up front costs, typically 30% to 50% lower than manufacturers and dealers, however, coverage may not be as expected.

Prepaid Credit Cards for Teenagers – Are They Good Or Bad?

The words credit cards and teenagers used in the same sentence is enough to strike terror in the hearts of most parents, and with good reason. Teenagers like to spend money. There is no way around it. There are clothes, music, movies, shoes, games, junk food and an assortment of other things to buy when you are a teenager. A credit card would certainly get them into trouble in no time. However, there is such a thing as prepaid credit cards for teenagers. This could be the answer for both you and your teenagers.

Getting a credit card of this kind for your teenager can set him on the path of learning how to manage money responsibly and earning some positive money managing skills. So while a regular credit card would most likely be too much temptation to handle, prepaid credit cards for teenagers can actually be a good idea.

If you are thinking of this as an option for your teenager, there are several different programs to investigate. You will want to explore just what choices there are available for prepaid credit cards for teenagers, and then select the one that suits you and your teenager best.

First Bank & Trust of Brookings, SD offers the Allow Prepaid Mastercard. This is a prepaid credit card for high school students and teenagers. It also comes with parental control to help monitor your teen's spending. There is an activation fee of $ 19.95 as well as a reload fee of $ 2.50 per $ 100. The monthly maintenance fee is $ 3.50.

The US Bank Visa Buxx Card is specifically made for teenagers 13 years and older. For this prepaid credit card for teenagers, there is an enrollment fee of $ 10 – $ 15 dollars and a reload fee of free to $ 2.50. There is not actually a monthly maintenance fee for this card. However, this is a $ 2 fee for an inactive account that is applied monthly if needed.

The above are examples of what is available in the form of prepaid credit cards for teenagers. Of course you will want to do your own research and possibly check with your bank to see if they have any sort of plan available for your teenager. If you have an active checking account with a financial institution, you may find a better deal in securing a prepaid credit card for your teenager. Whatever card you choose, be sure that you make full use of the parental monitoring of spending option. This is about learning to manage money and spending spreads will not help in this pursuit.

How To Read Jewelry Marks

The number markings on precious gold jewelry are a bit of confusion to lots of people. We are generally used to seeing a karat or silver mark like this: 10K, 14K, 18K, Sterling, etc. The numbers mean the same thing.

For 14k the number is technically 583 but most manufacturers adopted the European way and make 14k gold a tiny bit over 14k, so the mark is 585 in most 14k jewelry. 18K is marked 750. If the mark is valid and there is a makers mark also in the jewelry, the number means these items are 18k gold.

Here is where the numbers come from. Pure gold is called 24 karat. For 18k gold, there are 18 parts of pure gold mixed with other metals to make the metal suitable for use in jewelry. 24k is too soft alone to stand up or to hold stones well. 18 parts pure gold divided by 24, or 18/24 equals 750. That is where the number comes from. The jewelry is 75% pure gold, 750 parts gold with 250 parts other metals out of “1000″ parts. It is easier to think of it as a percent which is pure gold in the recipe.

Sterling silver is marked 925. Sterling is 92.5% pure silver and the rest is other metal, generally copper.

What does it mean if the ring marked 14K PR? The 14K simply means it is 14K (Karat) gold and because of the K means it would have been made in either South East Asia or The United States. The PR marks are just the Maker or Store ID or even a design mark, and have no relevance to the Value.

The basic decimal formula to work out the quality of gold content is quite simple, as they are all measured in ‘Parts per Thousand.’ This means that 9ct gold is calculated like this: 9 (for 9ct) is divided by pure gold (24) and then multiplied by 1000 (for pure gold as a decimal). ie: 9/24*1000=375 That 375 is the decimal quality for 9ct gold and is sometimes shown with a decimal point in front – .375

The old Victorian standard of 15ct gold is calculated the same way – 15/24*1000 = 625 (Not quite the numbers you have on your jewelry. Dental gold is 16ct or 666 recurring. But you can also reverse this formula by starting with the decimal and working back. ie: 375/1000*24 = 9

In your case we can use 698/1000*24 = almost 17ct

I have a platinum engagement ring and found a wedding ring that I really like but the band is made of palladium. Is it safe to wear these two metals together without one damaging the other?

It will wear the softer metal OVER TIME but that could take many years. My Grandmothers wedding ring eventually wore away the band of her engagement ring but it took over 20 years to do.

Platinum and Palladium and quite good together but I would take the advice of your local friendly jeweler and have them check both rings. Sometimes the Platinum may be a lower grade in order to make it harder – so have that checked.